Strikes can be achieved if straight balls go down the center of a bowling alley. But if you know how to throw a bowling ball curve, you will strike a lot more and cast it more reliably.

A straight ball that catches the hole will strike. It landed perfectly near the 18.5 board in the same high flush spot. A 15 or 16-pound ball will deflect less. So lighter balls can’t hit straight as well.

It demands plenty of time and practice to learn how to throw a bowling ball curve. But the effort pays off from the new spirit you have after you master this skill and increase your bowling score.

This article will start by guiding you through all tips, and you will get in touch with Mastering the Technique, Practicing your hook, and choosing the right ball.

How To Throw A Bowling Ball Curve

Mastering the Technique of  How To Throw A Bowling Ball Curve

  • Right Stance Startup
  • Focus On The Arrow
  • Start Your Approach
  • Release The Ball
  • Rotate Your Fingers
  • Control The Degree Of Your Curve

Practicing Your Hook 

  • Use a Tennis Ball
  • Think Of It Like Spiralling a Football
  • Use a Bowling Ball

Choosing the Right Ball

  • Using a House Ball
  • Fingertip Grip
  • Urethane or Resin Coating Ball
  • RG Ratings and Coverstock

Firstly, there is a necessity to master the techniques.

Right Stance Startup

Start your ball position comfortably in front of the shoulder of the ball but not before your body. A person just behind your shoulder should see a tiny amount of the ball. Your arm must aim at your target like an arrow.

Some individuals take longer, and it’s all right. But it’s great at least four stages. Based on your curve’s size, line up your toes with the marker on the path you want.

You know how to grasp your ball. However, you may need to change your style if you operate with a house ball. House balls have knuckle grips typically. Do not jam your fingers and especially your thumb in there quickly. Hold the ball so it meets with your wrist directly.

Focus On The Arrow

Always keep your attention on the arrow pointing in the direction of the lane you want to enter. Never put all of your attention on the pin you’re shooting for. Hitting the target ten feet in front of you is considerably easier than hitting one fifty feet in front of you.

The arrow you want to be hit will depend on the conditions in the lane (wet or dry). It is far easier to modify where you stand at the beginning of the game than to change the arrow to change the game’s direction.

You should adjust your starting point if something is missing to the left and vice versa if something is missing to the right. Even though it appears to be paradoxical, if you go to the left and continue to hit the same direction, the ball will travel further right at the start before turning to the left.

You can use the dots on the ground to assist you in modifying your position. The difference between the strike and the dread 7-10 splits can be as small as one board moved with your feet.

Start Your Approach

Start your approach in the same manner as you would a straight shot. Your strategy is the same as it would be for any other bare shot. Move to the foul line, turn around so your back faces the pins, and position your heel about two inches in the head of the center dot to establish the foul line.

Get four and a half steps backward from the foul line. Then pivot on your toes to face the pins to finish the move. This is the place to start; make any necessary adjustments.

The key to making a difference is in your follow-through, which is mainly in your control. As you usually would, bring your ball back into the swing position while keeping your palm behind the ball in the same place as before. Make sure to keep your wrist in good shape.

Putting too much weight on your wrist or twisting it too much can cause injury or fatigue before your frames are up.

Release The Ball

The ball should be released near the bottom of your swing, with your thumb being the first to come out ahead of your fingers. When you get to the finish, your fingers are the only thing holding the ball in place. They spin it as it comes loose, which is why your thumb needs to get out of the way at the very end.

Here are a few different hand positions to consider:

The traditional method of hooking the ball is to place your two index fingers and thumb in the three holes as you would typically do. Despite this, don’t make any changes.

While some players prefer not to place their thumb in the ball, others prefer to cup the ball on their palm or wrist as they swing it back and release it during the follow-through.

Despite this, some players only use one finger (the index finger) to insert into the slot and palm the ball, which then spins in the same motion when released. You still run the risk of the ball turning in your grip, which might result in broken wrists or fingers.

Rotate Your Fingers

Release the ball while rotating the ball’s exterior with your fingers, which will allow you to guide the ball’s spin with your fingers. To steer the ball down the lane, continue moving your hand during your swing until you reach a handshake position.

Aim to go from the 4 o’clock position to the 7 o’clock position in the ideal situation. The ball must be entirely out of your hands by the 7 o’clock position, and your arm should continue through to the 12 o’clock position with your hand up by your ear, all while your eyes are locked on the target you are attempting to hit.

Avoid accidentally slowing down your swing to concentrate on and nail your hook; the same amount of power is still required. Alternatively, if you do, you need to account for the difference; if you resume your regular throw, the hook may be very different.

Control The Degree Of Your Curve

Learn to manage the degree of your curve by changing the ball’s location and timing the ball’s release. Enhance the speed with which your fingers are released from the ball to increase the degree of the curvature. It is also possible that your counterclockwise motion will be more dramatic.

With a bit of practice, you’ll be able to tell if you’ve thrown a decent ball or not by how near you are to the arrow you’ve drawn.

If you’re having trouble understanding anything, isolate the variables and try with each one separately. Try beginning from a different location than you usually would.

Make an effort to vary your footwork. Experiment with various balls, if you want. It’s conceivable that your wrist and hand placement is perfect but that there’s another factor at play that’s throwing everything off.

By practicing your hook, you’ll be able to throw a bowling ball curve.

Use a Tennis Ball

Practice with a tennis ball. One fantastic technique is to practice a tennis ball without making an uncomfortable journey across the bowling alley. It helps you to throw the bowling ball curve.

If you toss it, it’ll go right, but when it hits the bounce, if you do it correctly, of course!

Another alternative is a pool ball, although the potential harm of adjacent items is slightly more significant!

Think Of It Like Spiralling a Football

Consider it similar to spiraling a football except on the upside-down side of the football field. You will recognize the general idea if you have previously curled a football. Underhanded, to say the very least. It’s pretty similar to how your fingertips slide along the side of the ball.

Consider the challenge of tossing a football underhanded while attempting to retain the same rotational speed. You cup your hand around it, and the last point of touch is between the tips of your fingers as it spins away from you.

Use a Bowling Ball

When you’re beginning to throw a bowling ball curve, use a bowling ball that is a few pounds lighter than the ball you usually use. A lighter ball helps you to concentrate on mastering the new throwing technique while maintaining your balance.

But, at that time, you have to come back up to your average level of play as quickly as possible. Because it is lighter in weight, you can better focus on what your hands should be doing. However, avoid getting used to it.

Yes, it is true that if you want to become a strong player, you’ll need hundreds or thousands of games under your credit. Mastering a basic technique shouldn’t require more than one night.

After getting all the above techniques, there is a need to choose the Right Ball.

Using a House Ball

Would you please keep in mind that you may have difficulties if you are using a home ball? A different, more spectacular approach will be required to get the same natural hook effect as bowling alley bowling balls. Straight strokes are intended for such balls.

Do not be concerned if you do not have one of your own. Your equipment probably is to blame.

Choose a weighted ball that is 10 percent of your body weight or less as a good rule of thumb. If you weigh 160 pounds, a 16-pound ball will suffice. That is if you are in good health and have no reason to believe that a lighter ball would be more appropriate for your (bowling) game.

This will assist you in understanding how to throw a bowling ball curve.

Fingertip Grip

Grab a ball that can grip your fingertip. Knuckle grips are available on some balls (including most house balls), in which the holes extend down to your second finger.

A fingertip grip, on the other hand, is far more favorable to delivering a hooked ball. Because you must remove your thumb and fingers, the motions are quicker and more fluid.

At the most fundamental level, however, learning how to toss a bowling ball curve is simple for anyone interested in learning. It is indeed possible to learn at the first level quite fast and with only a tiny amount of practice.

Urethane or Resin Coating Ball

Get your ball coated with urethane or resin to make it more durable. If your bowling ball has a urethane coverstock, you’ll find that your hook shot will be considerably more straightforward.

They do not absorb oil from the lane. They provide significantly more friction than a regular plastic ball. Those two factors, taken together, form that bond for success.

Reactive resin balls are more sensible to alley conditions. They are also operator mistakes than other types of balls because of the friction. This offers them more challenges to handle as a consequence.

A resin coating can sink into the oil in the lane, increasing the likelihood of striking the target you are going for. However, they are a significant financial commitment. They should only be held by the most serious of bowlers to throw a bowling ball curve.

RG Ratings and Coverstock

RG ratings and coverstock should be inquired about if you are considering purchasing your ball. A ball with a high differential RG rating will produce a sharp curve due to its shape.

It is possible to have fun with a low differential, as long as the coverstock has a matte finish to protect it from lane oil and other contaminants. A stiff or pearl coverstock may be preferable when dealing with an uncooperative lane.

There are so many possibilities! When in doubt, explain your predicament to the administrative assistant. They can select the right ball for you as long as you provide them with all of your factors and a description of what you want to do.

As you improve your skill level, you’ll want to look for a ball that is drilled for your particular grip and position. If you buy the wrong one, you may not enjoy it as much as one that is a good fit for you. Patience is key to improving your game!

Frequently Asked Questions

How do you throw a bowling ball curve?

Firstly, there is a necessity to master the techniques.

  • Right Stance Startup
  • Focus On The Arrow
  • Start Your Approach
  • Release The Ball
  • Rotate Your Fingers
  • Control The Degree Of Your Curve

By practicing your hook, you’ll be able to throw a bowling ball curve.

  • Use a Tennis Ball
  • Think Of It Like Spiralling a Football
  • Use a Bowling Ball

After getting all the above techniques, there is a need to choose the Right Ball.

  • Using a House Ball
  • Fingertip Grip
  • Urethane or Resin Coating Ball
  • RG Ratings and Coverstock

How do bowlers make the ball curve?

Release the ball while rotating the ball’s exterior with your fingers. It will allow you to guide the ball’s spin with your fingers. To steer the ball down the lane, continue moving your hand during your swing until you reach a handshake position. Aim to go from the 4 o’clock position to the 7 o’clock position in the ideal situation.

Is it wrong to bowl straight?

When it comes to hitting the pins with force, straight bowling is typically favored by more powerful bowlers. Since it allows them to throw as hard as possible without altering the shot’s direction, the increased power will only be beneficial as long as the ball travels in a straight line.

How heavy should my bowling ball be?

As a general rule of thumb, the ideal bowling ball should weigh around 10% of your body weight, up to a maximum weight of 160 pounds. The 8-pound bowling ball will look outrageously light in contrast to your 200-pound body weight, despite if you weigh 200 pounds.

Is a heavier ball better in bowling?

Heavy balls have more hitting and driving force, whereas lighter balls have more pin action. The use of a 1-pound lighter ball is anticipated to alleviate the stress put on a bowler’s body throughout the 30-week Liga session, a competition, or, in the case of the pro bowlers, a tourist season by a substantial amount.